Pills ‘n’ Chills and Deli Bakes

Yesterday I was in Tamworth for the summer food festival, enjoying excellent locally produced pork pies, sausage rolls and blue cheese.

After a gentle stroll around the town, I hopped back into the car and headed to Hopwas for a forage. For once, my walk took me along the canal in the opposite direction to the woods, a decision which may have been influenced by having read about a disused and reputedly haunted cemetery on Hints Road.

The graveyard once belonged to Hopwas Chapel, built in 1836 and dedicated to St John, and its resident ghost is said to be a small boy who can be seen by children (but not by a childish 39 year old it seems). The chapel was pulled down in the 1880s, as it was ‘full, small and inconvenient’, and replaced by the gorgeous St Chad’s Church up on the hill. A drawing of the old chapel can be seen here on the Stafforshire Past Track site. The old font survived and stands outside the new church, and the chapel’s bell still tolls in St Chad’s tower.  According to a report in the Tamworth Herald on Saturday 16th April 1898, the holy table from St John’s was made use of in the new Workhouse chapel.

St Chad’s, Hopwas, dedicated and opened in 1881

The old font from St John’s Chapel

Nearby, I found a cottage with the best name ever, which fitted in perfectly with the theme of the day, followed by a pill box in a field alongside the River Tame.

Too well guarded by nettles to even attempt to take a look inside, I plan to return as part of a much longer pill box walk along this section of the Western Command Stop Line Number 5 in winter. If I eat as much as I did at the summer festival, on the way home from the Tamworth Christmas food festival would probably be a good time….

 

Sources:

http://www.stedithas.org.uk/A%20Look%20Around%20St%20Chads.pdf

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Plane Site

Over the weekend I had the following message from David Mace on the subject of RAF Lichfield.

At the Jet Age Museum, Staverton, Gloucester; we are reconstructing the cockpit section of a Hawker Typhoon 1B to be included as a museum exhibit. The remains of this aircraft cockpit were recovered from Flower’s scrap yard, Chippenham in the mid-90’s. Information on the project is available here:

http://www.jetagemuseum.org/Typhoon.aspx

No. 51 Maintenance unit scrapped approximately 900 Hawker Typhoons at Royal Air Force Station Lichfield, also known as Fradley Aerodrome between 1945 and 1947, and, although most of the airframes were recycled, it is possible that some items remain in the surrounding woodlands and hedges/ditches. It was quite common for the salvage crews to dump parts in these locations.

The Typhoon Project team are seeking information as to the possible whereabouts of surviving items that can be included in the rebuild project, and any information would be much appreciated.

 

David believes that much of the scrapping was carried out in the Curborough area, south of the airfield. We’re hoping to do a Lichfield Discovered walk over the next month or so to see if we can turn anything up (we never need much of an excuse to go and rummage around in ditches!). RAF Lichfield was Staffordshire’s busiest wartime airfields and although closed in 1958, and sold four years later, the following photographs, taken by David Moore on our RAF Fradley walk last summer, show just how much of interest still exists at the site. More details on the walk to follow, but in the meantime if anyone does have any information, please get in touch and I’ll forward it on to David Mace.

RAF Fradley 1

RAF Fradley 4

RAF Fradley 3

RAF FRadley 2